A Zero-Waste Bar

Our bar program aims to be zero-waste by working with suppliers that embody a sustainable ethos, and composting our waste on-site. We source our ingredients from a local forager and six different farms in Hong Kong. Our suppliers have also been chosen for quality ingredients and for implementing a no-plastic approach.

BAY OF BENGAL

 

Coconut-Washed Gin, Aveze, Bitters, Sandalwood Tincture, Spiced Mango, Lemon, Black Pepper, Indian Tonic

 


 

Historically referred to as “black gold” thanks to its extraordinarily high value among ancient traders, black pepper was at one time more precious than gold or pearls. Native to South and Southeast Asia, black pepper is still to this day one of the most widely traded spices in the world.

DIPLOMACY

 

Rhuharb & Dill Cordial, Plantation 3 Rum, Fernet Hunter, Distilled Campari, Spent Earl Grey Tincture

 


 

The earliest recorded use of rhubarb dates back to 2700 B.C. in China, where the plant was cultivated for medicinal purposes. Marco Polo spoke at great length about the beneficial uses of rhubarb, and even brought it to Europe in the 13th century as a medicinal drug. It wasn’t until the 1800s that a new variety of rhubarb was introduced in England in honor of Queen Victoria (aptly named the “Victoria”) which was superior in flavor and quality, and soon became widely popular as a cooking ingredient in kitchens across England. The “Victoria” is still considered the gold standard of rhubarb today.

DISCOVERY

 

Chocolate Malt Johnnie Walker Black, Pineapple Kamm & Sons, Cardamom, Local Bee Pollen

 


 

The explorer Christopher Columbus first discovered pineapples on the island of Guadeloupe. It then made its way to the Caribbean, America and Mexico. Pineapple cultivation then spread to Europe, but because of the high cost of building and maintaining hothouses (as pineapples need a temperate climate to grow), they became a symbol of wealth. Instead of being eaten, the fruit was displayed at dinner parties, and used repeatedly until they were rotten. By the late 1700s, production of pineapples on British estates caused rivalries between certain aristocratic families.

INTO THE WILDERNESS

 

Lemon Verbena Gin, Waste Falernum, Peach, Lemon, Recycled Pineapple

 


 

Cloves were first discovered during the 16th century in Indonesia, where it was tradition for parents to plant a clove tree when their child was born. It was believed that if the tree flourished, so too would the child live a long and happy life. The oldest clove tree, which is said to be 350-400 years old, resides in the Indonesian city of Ternate. Rumour has it that a roving Frenchman stole seedlings from that very tree in 1770 and brought them to Zanzibar, which soon became the world’s largest clove producer.

KAMINO

 

Akayane Natsu Gin, Sansho Pepper, Lemon, White Miso, Hojicha Liqueur

 


 

The origins of green tea (hojicha) can be traced back to the Tang dynasty, when China was at its peak of cultural influence over Japan. In 1191, Esai – a Japanese Buddhist Monk who had been studying in China – brought tea seeds back to Japan with him, and with his knowledge of the ancient methods for preparing matcha, he popularised the tradition of serving tea to the samurai class.

NO POCKETS, NO CUFFS

 

Distilled Sunflower, Italicus, Beetroot, Lemon, White Pepper Tincture, Pea Soda

 


 

Though pepper was very costly to ship across the Silk Road, it was such a desirable and luxurious commodity in medieval Europe that Italian traders could essentially set their own prices. Sailors and labourers stationed at Venetian and Genoan trade ports – which held a monopoly over the pepper trade past the Mediterranean – were required to cut off or sew their clothing pockets shut to ensure no one could steal highly valuable white peppercorns.

UPROOTED

 

Pandan Vodka, Tea-Smoked Ginger, Lime, Passionfruit Honey, Kaffir Lime Tincture

 


 

The ginger plant was originally found in Southeast Asia, until it was domesticated and carried into China & India by traders. It has been used in Chinese and Indian medicine for centuries to prevent and treat a wide range of ailments.

WANDERER

 

Wild Licorice Botanist Gin, Cacao Nib Honey, Almond, Lime, Fig Leaf

 


 

The existence of almonds goes as far back as biblical times, when it was considered a prized ingredient often used in breads for ancient monarchs. Though its exact ancestry is unknown, almonds were thought to have originated in China and Central Asia. While traversing the Silk Road between Asia and the Mediterranean, explorers would snack on the nutritious nut to stay energised. Before long, almond trees flourished in the Mediterranean.

Our bar program aims to be zero-waste by working with suppliers that embody a sustainable ethos, and composting our waste on-site. We source our ingredients from a local forager and six different farms in Hong Kong. Our suppliers have also been chosen for quality ingredients and for implementing a no-plastic approach.

BAY OF BENGAL

 

Coconut-Washed Gin, Aveze, Bitters, Sandalwood Tincture, Spiced Mango, Lemon, Black Pepper, Indian Tonic

 


 

Historically referred to as “black gold” thanks to its extraordinarily high value among ancient traders, black pepper was at one time more precious than gold or pearls. Native to South and Southeast Asia, black pepper is still to this day one of the most widely traded spices in the world.

DIPLOMACY

 

Rhuharb & Dill Cordial, Plantation 3 Rum, Fernet Hunter, Distilled Campari, Spent Earl Grey Tincture

 


 

The earliest recorded use of rhubarb dates back to 2700 B.C. in China, where the plant was cultivated for medicinal purposes. Marco Polo spoke at great length about the beneficial uses of rhubarb, and even brought it to Europe in the 13th century as a medicinal drug. It wasn’t until the 1800s that a new variety of rhubarb was introduced in England in honor of Queen Victoria (aptly named the “Victoria”) which was superior in flavor and quality, and soon became widely popular as a cooking ingredient in kitchens across England. The “Victoria” is still considered the gold standard of rhubarb today.

DISCOVERY

 

Chocolate Malt Johnnie Walker Black, Pineapple Kamm & Sons, Cardamom, Local Bee Pollen

 


 

The explorer Christopher Columbus first discovered pineapples on the island of Guadeloupe. It then made its way to the Caribbean, America and Mexico. Pineapple cultivation then spread to Europe, but because of the high cost of building and maintaining hothouses (as pineapples need a temperate climate to grow), they became a symbol of wealth. Instead of being eaten, the fruit was displayed at dinner parties, and used repeatedly until they were rotten. By the late 1700s, production of pineapples on British estates caused rivalries between certain aristocratic families.

INTO THE WILDERNESS

 

Lemon Verbena Gin, Waste Falernum, Peach, Lemon, Recycled Pineapple

 


 

Cloves were first discovered during the 16th century in Indonesia, where it was tradition for parents to plant a clove tree when their child was born. It was believed that if the tree flourished, so too would the child live a long and happy life. The oldest clove tree, which is said to be 350-400 years old, resides in the Indonesian city of Ternate. Rumour has it that a roving Frenchman stole seedlings from that very tree in 1770 and brought them to Zanzibar, which soon became the world’s largest clove producer.

KAMINO

 

Akayane Natsu Gin, Sansho Pepper, Lemon, White Miso, Hojicha Liqueur

 


 

The origins of green tea (hojicha) can be traced back to the Tang dynasty, when China was at its peak of cultural influence over Japan. In 1191, Esai – a Japanese Buddhist Monk who had been studying in China – brought tea seeds back to Japan with him, and with his knowledge of the ancient methods for preparing matcha, he popularised the tradition of serving tea to the samurai class.

NO POCKETS, NO CUFFS

 

Distilled Sunflower, Italicus, Beetroot, Lemon, White Pepper Tincture, Pea Soda

 


 

Though pepper was very costly to ship across the Silk Road, it was such a desirable and luxurious commodity in medieval Europe that Italian traders could essentially set their own prices. Sailors and labourers stationed at Venetian and Genoan trade ports – which held a monopoly over the pepper trade past the Mediterranean – were required to cut off or sew their clothing pockets shut to ensure no one could steal highly valuable white peppercorns.

UPROOTED

 

Pandan Vodka, Tea-Smoked Ginger, Lime, Passionfruit Honey, Kaffir Lime Tincture

 


 

The ginger plant was originally found in Southeast Asia, until it was domesticated and carried into China & India by traders. It has been used in Chinese and Indian medicine for centuries to prevent and treat a wide range of ailments.

WANDERER

 

Wild Licorice Botanist Gin, Cacao Nib Honey, Almond, Lime, Fig Leaf

 


 

The existence of almonds goes as far back as biblical times, when it was considered a prized ingredient often used in breads for ancient monarchs. Though its exact ancestry is unknown, almonds were thought to have originated in China and Central Asia. While traversing the Silk Road between Asia and the Mediterranean, explorers would snack on the nutritious nut to stay energised. Before long, almond trees flourished in the Mediterranean.

The Largest Gin Collection in Hong Kong

Home to the largest collection of gin in Hong Kong with over 400 varieties housed onsite, John Anthony’s Signature Infused Gin & Tonics form the cornerstone of the bar menu. Four 12-litre gin tubes positioned at the centre of the restaurant’s stylish bar area are filled with different gins that are house-infused with various botanicals, whilst also serving as a striking design feature.

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SHISO & ELDERFLOWER

Gin, Green Tea, Lime, Mint, Tonic

SUN-DRIED TOMATO

Gin, Rosemary, Bay Leaf, Juniper, 1724 Tonic

RHUBARB & GINGER

Gin, Grapefruit, Ginger, House-Made Tonic

STRAWBERRY & APPLE

Gin, Local Honey, Blackcurrant, Cardamom Bitters, Light Tonic

The Largest Gin Collection in Hong Kong

Home to the largest collection of gin in Hong Kong with over 400 varieties housed onsite, John Anthony’s Signature Infused Gin & Tonics form the cornerstone of the bar menu. Four 12-litre gin tubes positioned at the centre of the restaurant’s stylish bar area are filled with different gins that are house-infused with various botanicals, whilst also serving as a striking design feature.

JA_WEBSITE_BAR_PAGE_09AUG19_DRAFT_GIN2-12

SHISO & ELDERFLOWER

Gin, Green Tea, Lime, Mint, Tonic

JA_WEBSITE_BAR_PAGE_09AUG19_DRAFT_GIN2-13

SUN-DRIED TOMATO

Gin, Rosemary, Bay Leaf, Juniper, 1724 Tonic

JA_WEBSITE_BAR_PAGE_09AUG19_DRAFT_GIN2-14

RHUBARB & GINGER

Gin, Grapefruit, Ginger, House-Made Tonic

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STRAWBERRY & APPLE

Gin, Local Honey, Blackcurrant, Cardamom Bitters, Light Tonic

Wine

Our wide variety of organic, biodynamic and natural wines are produced by farmers who believe in sustainable agriculture and socially responsible farming methods that respect to our land and nature. The process of growing these grapes involves a closer relationship to nature, with minimal manmade intervention. This allows each bottle, as an end result, to tell a unique story of what climate, soil and vintage the wine was developed in.

JA_WEBSITE_DESIGN_PAGE_1920x1200_WINE2
JA_WEBSITE_DESIGN_PAGE_1920x1200_WINE2

Wine

Our wide variety of organic, biodynamic and natural wines are produced by farmers who believe in sustainable agriculture and socially responsible farming methods that respect to our land and nature. The process of growing these grapes involves a closer relationship to nature, with minimal manmade intervention. This allows each bottle, as an end result, to tell a unique story of what climate, soil and vintage the wine was developed in.

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Tea & Coffee

In China today, 96% of farms use chemical pesticides in tea cultivation, which damages healthy soil and harms the ecosystem. We partner with a small pool of farmers in China who cultivate tea through “wild grown” methods – free of pesticides and and chemical fertilisers – to provide the highest quality, eco-friendly tea leaves.

Our coffee beans are 100% fair trade, organic Sumatra beans, grown and processed by a co-op consisting of 90% female farmers, which was created to support opportunities for women in developing and emerging economies.

JA_WEBSITE_DESIGN_PAGE_1920x1200_Tea

Tea & Coffee

In China today, 96% of farms use chemical pesticides in tea cultivation, which damages healthy soil and harms the ecosystem. We partner with a small pool of farmers in China who cultivate tea through “wild grown” methods – free of pesticides and and chemical fertilisers – to provide the highest quality, eco-friendly tea leaves.

Our coffee beans are 100% fair trade, organic Sumatra beans, grown and processed by a co-op consisting of 90% female farmers, which was created to support opportunities for women in developing and emerging economies.

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